Monthly Feature


So Long Until September

Concord North BridgeIt has been a busy fall and winter for ConcordCAN!; and we have decided to stop our newsletter until September. There will be no ConcordCAN! events unit October. The first Sustainable Concord Coffee of the fall season will be scheduled for the third Tuesday in October.

During the summer break ConcordCAN! will not be idle. We will be using the time to plan for a new approach to our website and newsletter.

Specifics of this new approach are on the drawing board and will be shared with our subscribers in September.

If there are important events coming up during the summer, we will inform you about them by special bulletins. Please let us know if there are things you feel people should know about. We would appreciate your help.



BOOK REVIEW

Tales from an Uncertain World
What Other Assorted Disasters Can Teach Us About Climate Change

Tales from an Uncertain World

By L. S. Gardiner

So far, humanity hasn’t done very well addressing ongoing climate catastrophe. Veteran science educator L. S. Gardiner believes we can learn to do better by understanding how we’ve dealt with other types of environmental risks in the past and why we are dragging our feet in addressing this most urgent emergency. Weaving scientific facts and research together with humor and emotion, Gardiner explores human responses to erosion, earthquakes, fires, invasive species, marine degradation, volcanic eruptions, and floods in order to illuminate why we find it so challenging to deal with climate change. Insight emerges from unexpected places—a mermaid exhibit, a Magic 8 Ball, and midcentury cartoons about a future that never came to be.

Instead of focusing on the economics and geopolitics of the debate over climate change, this book brings large-scale disaster to a human scale, emphasizing the role of the individual. We humans do have the capacity to deal with disasters. When we face threatening changes, we don’t just stand there pretending it isn’t so, we do something. But because we’re human, our responses aren’t always the right ones the first time—yet we can learn to do better. This book is essential reading for all who want to know how we can draw on our strengths to survive the climate catastrophe and forge a new relationship with nature.

Further information about the book .


Get Involved


Concerned about the impact of climate change and other threats to our natural environment?


Keep Good Stuff out of Landfills!

The Freecycle Network® is made up of 5,000+ groups with over 9 million members across the globe. It's a grassroots, entirely nonprofit movement of people who are giving (and getting) stuff for free in their own towns. Our mission is to build a worldwide sharing movement that reduces waste, saves precious resources & eases the burden on our landfills while enabling our members to benefit from the strength of a larger community.

Find active groups in Massachusetts: BrowseFreeCycle


Join the ConcordCAN! Facebook Group

facebook logo If you haven’t done so, check out the ConcordCAN! Facebook group as an interactive way for people to be involved with ConcordCAN!. Just click the link and request to join. You’ll be able to share articles and events with the group, find out about upcoming environmental events in the area, and receive invitations to ConcordCAN! sponsored events, such as speakers, coffees and more. We hope you “Like” it, share with us what you are interested in, and invite others to join.


Join The Biodiversity Climate Action Network (BioCAN) and subscribe to their seasonal newsletter

BioCAN, the Concord Area Biodiversity Network, publishes seasonal newsletters. The most recent edition contains up-to-date information about what is happening to our natural environment due to our ways of managing, or mismanaging, our land and water. It addresses the causes of degradation in natural systems and what we can do at home and in the community to restore them. There is also some discussion in the winter edition about a citizen petition on climate resiliency, submitted by Lori Pazaris, which will be coming up at Concord’s spring Town Meeting. If you would like to receive this newsletter and possibly get involved with BioCAN write to Lori Pazaris at BioCAN.


Become a Citizen Scientist

Satellite Map of a backyardThe YardMap Network is a citizen science project designed to cultivate a richer understanding of bird habitat, for both professional scientists and people concerned with their local environments. We collect data by asking individuals across the country to literally draw maps of their backyards, parks, farms, favorite birding locations, schools, and gardens. We connect you with your landscape details and provide tools for you to make better decisions about how to manage landscapes sustainably.


Review NRDC's Sustainable Living Suggestions

This Month: visit - GoodGuide -to find safe, healthy, green, and ethical product reviews based on scientific ratings wth over 250,000 products on our site, we can help you find what you're looking for.


Green Tips for a Healthy Planet

Read suggestions from Global Stewards. First: Reduce The critical first step of waste prevention has been overshadowed by a focus on recycling. Please help to promote a greater awareness of the importance of the "Reduce" part of the Reduce-Reuse-Recycle mantra. For a great overview of how raw materials and products move around the world, see the video The Story of Stuff


picture of parade environmental light bulb


Join the ConcordCAN! email list

Receive announcements and updates. Send an email message to concordclimate@gmail.com and you’ll get ConcordCAN’s monthly newsletter and special bulletins through the ConcordCAN Google Group.


Become a change agent within your group

If you are a member of a church, civic organization, or business that is not yet committed to sustainability, climate action, or “green” goals, become active in raising consciousness. We will work with you to give you the help and support you need.


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